Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agresan Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

Agrasen Jayanti

Shillong Agarwal Samiti

 

History

The Agrawals, who belong to the large Vaishya community, are found in almost every part of India. They are also known as Banias because of their occupation.

The term `Vaishya` is very comprehensive and covers several business communities such as the Agrawal, Maheshwari, Khandelwal, Oswal, Jaiswal, Poswal, Dasse and Mahajan. Of these, the Agrawal is by far the largest community.

The name Agrawal or Aggarwal is derived from the Agragan state said to be founded by Maharaja Agrasen some 5000 years ago.

Most Agrawals follow Hinduism, although some are Jains. The texts and legends of the Agrawal community trace the origin of Agrawals to the legendary king Agrasena of the Solar Dynasty who adopted Vanika dharma.

Literally, Agrawal means the “children of Agrasena” or the “people of Agroha”, a city in ancient Kuru Panchala, near Hisar in Haryana region said to be founded by Agrasena.
Several large business organizations were founded by members of the Agarwal community — such as Bharti, Airtel, ArcelorMittal, and The Times Group.

The Agrawal merchant Nattal Sahu, and the Agrawal poet Vibudh Shridhar lived during the reign of the Tomara King Anangapal of Yoginipur (now Mehrauli, near Delhi).

Vibudh Shridhar wrote Pasanahacariu in 1132 AD, which includes a historical account of Yoginipur (early Delhi near Mehrauli).

In 1354, Firuz Shah Tughluq had started the construction of a new city near Agroha, called Hisar-e-Feroza (the fort of Firuz). Most of the raw material for building the town was brought from Agroha. The town later came to be called Hisar. Hisar became a major center of the Agrawal community.
Later, during the Mughal rule, and during the British East India Company administration, some Agrawals migrated to Bihar and Kolkata, who became the major component of the Marwaris.

The Mughals were relatively liberal, and some Agrawals rose to prominent positions in this period. Sahu Todar Mal was a supervisor of the royal mint at Agra, who had rebuilt the 514 Jain stupas at Mathura in 1573, during the rule of Akbar.

Sah Ranveer Singh was a royal treasurer during the rule of Akbar. He was awarded a jagir in western UP, where he established the town Saharanpur.

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